Maid Marian Way

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Maid Marian Way was developed from the late 1950s. Prior to this, no thoroughfare existed here. Post-War increases in traffic and enthusiasm for 'modern' city planning led to the redevelopment of the area between the bottom of Derby Road and Broadmarsh.

Many of the old Medieval streets, which ran between the Castle Hill and the Market Square area, were cut though, and buildings demolished to made way for its development. Some buildings survived, such as The Salutation Inn, The Royal Children Pub, and St Nicholas' Church, but with their frontages much reduced. (There are many photographs of the old buildings and streets which can be seen on this web site). The result was the 1960s huge blocks of offices, large shops, like Tesco and their 'Green Shield Stamp' shop, and the unpopular pedestrian underpasses. The new road traffic system was successful with regard to the through flow of traffic, but on a human pedestrian scale, the area was not so successful, particularly after the closure of the Mount Street Bus Station. In the 1970s the road was voted to be 'One of the ugliest in Europe'!, and shops and offices were constantly changing traders or closing for business. In the 1980s the City Council started a programme to improve the area; flowers and trees were planted, and road crossings were improved giving better pedestrian access. Today, the road is still being developed (for the better): with the new tram lines incorporated into it; offices have been redeveloped into hotels; and it has many thriving shops, bars, restaurants, and a casino. The old Tesco building now houses 'The Tales of Robin Hood' tourist attraction.

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1966

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1987

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March 1961

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11 February 1988

Maid Marion Way, Office Blocks, 1966

Looking North-West towards the Royal Children Public House and St Nicholas Church. Part of Peoples College on the left.

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1960 - South end from Walton House, showing modern block of People's College (Now Castle College Nottingham), and Castle Gate. Looking towards Canal St

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1963

Showing The Salutation Public House From the junction with Spaniel Row, St Nicholas Street and Hounds Gate. A Plaque near the Maid Marian Way entrances states: 'The present house was built c. 1240 on the site of the 13th century Ale House known as 'The Archangel Gabriel Salutes the Virgin Mary.' Its name and sign refers to the salutation 'Ave Maria, plene gratia,' given by the Archangel Gabriel to the Blessed Virgin; and as this sign was not infrequently associated with inns belonging to religious houses, an idea exists that this inn may have been the guest-house of either the Carmelite or the Franciscan friary of Nottingham. '1240 AD' is displayed on the apex wall but apparently the first building on the site then belonged to a 'tanner' (someone who made animal skins into leather). Their workshops were on the ground floor, with living accommodation above for both the 'tanner' and his workers. (In 1992, Nottingham University's Department of Archaeology's tree dating labs put a date of the oldest timber (the inner ring) in the pub as being circa 1360' apparently in those days timber was not left to season so that date is probably an accurate estimate as to when the pub we know today was actually built, and not 1240 as is stated on the apex wall (which was probably the date of the first building on the site). In 1440, borough records recorded this date as having a private dwelling on the site, belonging to a man named John Alastre. During The Civil War, in the 1640's, it was used by Oliver Cromwell's Roundheads as a recruiting room. In 1937 following an investigation by the Thoroton Excavation Society, it was thought that the 9th century caves beneath the pub were lived in by the local Saxon folk (the ghost of a young four year old girl is rumoured to haunt the caves). In directories, The Salutation's name varies and is sometimes referred to as 'Ye Olde Salutation'. In the late 1970's-1980's 'The Sal', as it was popularly known, was regularly frequented by bikers and the heavy-rock fans. There have been two major refits since the early 70's; The latter being the introduction of a second public staircase allowing access to the upstairs bar. Within the last two year's Tony Robinson and the Channel Four Time Team programme visited and tried to date all three of Nottingham's oldest pubs (the Bell, the Trip to Jerusalem, and the Salutation).

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1995

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A church of St. Nicholas was erected on the site of the present building soon after the Conquest, and it seems to have been very like the St. Peter's Church that we know. Whatever its appearance, it did its work usefully and quietly as a parish church until 1642. Then the times were out of joint. King Charles and the Parliament were at each other's throat, and the country rang with the battle cry of the Roundhead and Cavalier. Colonel Huchinson held Nottingham Castle for the Parliament, and was attacked by a body of Newarkers acting for the King. They were almost successful in their attempt but not quite. However, they established themselves in the tower of the old St. Nicholas Church, and proceeded to bombard the garrison of the Castle with such effect that when they were finally dislodged, Colonel Hutchinson felt that he dare not expose his men to a repetition of the experience, and so caused the old church to be completely destroyed. The homeless congregation were accommodated in a loft over St. Peter's Chancel but they were once more rendered homeless by a fresh bombardment, for thirty-five years the site of St. Nicholas remained vacant, but at last in 1678 a fresh start was made and a new church was erected, the nucleus of today's building. Men were war-weary and tired of being over-governed. King Charles II had been restored to the throne of his fathers a dozen years before, and all the golden promise of that anna mirabilis had faded into disappointment. The ancient nobility and gentry were impoverished by sequestration and taxation, and the new owners of wealth had not had time to realise their responsibilities. All this and much more is reflected in the poorness of the architecture and the cheapness of the material of the portions of St. Nicholas Church which date from about the time of Titus Oates. (information from www.nottshistory.org.uk) No illustration is known to exist of the earlier building.

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This view shows the north west aspect of the Church from Maid Marian Way.

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1963 - Looking south to Canal Street. Maid Marian Way was developed from the late 1950s. Prior to this, no thoroughfare existed here. Post-War increases in traffic and enthusiasm for 'modern' city planning led to the redevelopment of the area between the bottom of Derby Road and Broadmarsh. Many of the old Medieval streets, which ran between the Castle Hill and the Market Square area, were cut though, and buildings demolished to made way for its development. Some buildings survived, such as The Salutation Inn, The Royal Children Pub, and St Nicholas' Church, but with their frontages much reduced. (There are many photographs of the old buildings and streets which can be seen on this web site). The result was the 1960s huge blocks of offices, large shops, like Tesco and their 'Green Shield Stamp' shop, and the unpopular pedestrian underpasses. The new road traffic system was successful with regard to the through flow of traffic, but on a human pedestrian scale, the area was not so successful, particularly after the closure of the Mount Street Bus Station. In the 1970s the road was voted to be 'One of the ugliest in Europe'!, and shops and offices were constantly changing traders or closing for business. In the 1980s the City Council started a programme to improve the area; flowers and trees were planted, and road crossings were improved giving better pedestrian access. Today, the road is still being developed (for the better): with the new tram lines incorporated into it; offices have been redeveloped into hotels; and it has many thriving shops, bars, restaurants, and a casino. The old Tesco building now houses 'The Tales of Robin Hood' tourist attraction.